Tag Archives: level 4

Uchi mata – Reflecting on the session

This is the 6th post for my assignment on the EJU L4 performance coach award

My first aim was to try to acknowledge the learner’s existing knowledge and abilities from their demonstrations and examples of Uchi mata and their goal setting templates as this would form the foundations for improving their knowledge and skills.

I also felt it was important to interact with the players in a nonjudgmental and constructive manner during conversations and identified with the players the targeted skills required and a timeline for the practice of the technical skills process and I developed with the players, a plan for practice of the skills necessary to achieve some of the targets that were set together.

I believed that by engaging the players in reflection on the usefulness, effectiveness of the throw and need for continuation of this coaching process, I would get better involvement from the players in the process, as they would feel part of the actual process rather than relying on the coach to be the person providing all the input.

Sometimes I am guilty of maybe being too generic with the group, for example pushing one particular way of doing things and hoping that this suits everyone. This approach may have killed any creativity players may have had and doesn’t allow for individuals to think outside of the box.

Hopefully my approach in the Uchi mata session will bear fruit in time ?


Flavio Canto – Shime waza – Technical session

This is the 3rd post for my assignment on the EJU L4 performance coach award.

There are only a few days to go before some of the students compete in the British Championships in Sheffield England. I decided that to avoid injury before the competition we would look at a Shime-waza used by Flavio Canto (BRA). I have posted 2 videos above, one showing competition examples of this technique and another showing a more basic introduction to the technique.

By the group practicing Ne-waza there was little risk of the players getting injured.

Firstly we completed a simple ne-waza warm up with the players practicing their own favorite (Tokui-waza) ne-waza techniques turn for turn in a nice relaxed manner with little resistance from their Uke.

Once they were warm I began to demonstrate the technique using a democratic coaching style as I wanted to encourage the students to have input into the session as much as possible in order for them to be able to practice the technique and be prepared to engage in discussion about the technique afterwards.

As I was working with a group that were very competent in Ne-waza and even though the technique itself was quite complex, i felt they would be capable of introducing it into their Ne-waza repertoire in future and would also give the group a new technical skill to develop after the competition in their technical training sessions.

When it was time for them to practice, I asked them to reflect on wether the technique was suitable for them to use in a competitive situation and to raise any questions if they had any difficulty and to evaluate their own performance of the technique. We also had lots of time to discuss issues and get input from each person during the session. I also asked them to record the session in their training diaries – I have attached a copy of a blank page of the diary to show the type of content I ask them to record.

Technical / Tactical session – Training Diary


Athlete profiles – For the EJU L4 Performance Coach Award & Foundation Degree in Sports Coaching (European Judo Union)

This is the second post for my assignment on the EJU L4 performance coach award. I will Introduce the group of players that I work with on a daily basis.

There are 10 of them in total and the age range is between 16 to 18 years of age, female and male judoka, with the lightest being 48Kg and the heaviest 110Kg. There is a wide range of ability within the group from Junior Great Britain squad players, England squad players and regional players. The group have an excellent work ethic and will to train hard and they all have a good understanding of the technical and tactical skills needed to perform at this Junior level. In following posts  I will blog about some of the coaching sessions conducted recently and include how as a coach I choose to present the material, ask questions, and to correct misconceptions, and to encourage the athletes to explore.